The trend of Saudi students disappearing after being charged with or convicted of extremely serious crimes, just to re-appear back in their home country seems to be growing.

According to a new The Oregonian article, more than eight Saudi students have seemingly vanished after being charged, in most cases after the Saudi embassy paid bail.

The same report notes that the individuals who have vanished were charged with extremely serious crimes such as child pornography, manslaughter, and rape.

According to a letter obtained by The Oregonian, “to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and the acting attorney general, Matthew Whitaker, Friday that the new theory from authorities that Noorah used an illicit passport to fly home on a private jet provided by the Saudi consulate should be reason to push forward with action”.

An international problem

Perhaps the most interesting point is that the Saudi government has allegedly engaged in this kind of action not just in the United States, but also in countries such as Canada.

In early 2019 for example, a 28-year-old Saudi man charged with sexually assaulting a Cape Breton woman went missing, after having his bail paid for by the Saudi government, and his passport retained by the Canadian government.

That individual also had more than $30,000 in unpaid parking fees, which were never covered. He is currently believed to be safe, living in Saudi Arabia.

This kind of action is by no means unexpected from the Saudi government, who in the past year has been in the spotlight for its targeted assassination of a journalist in the Saudi embassy in Turkey, as well as its continued use of the restriction on freedom of speech as well human rights.

The state has also been called for the execution of a maid who killed her rapist in self-defense.

Will the world continue to allow this kind of global rule breaking from the Saudi state? We will have to wait and see.

What is extremely obvious though, is that the Saudi state does not want anyone calling out their aggressive and rogue like actions.

For example, the Saudi state has pulled out almost all investments into Canada, expelled the Canadian Ambassador, and recalled all of their foreign students, largely to hurt the Canadian economy, as a punishment for the Canadian government’s comments on Saudi Arabia’s track record on human rights.

With Saudi Arabia openly wielding its new found power and global influence, we may have to ask ourselves.

Should countries risk economic loss in order to stop Saudi state’s rogue like actions?

What do you think? Join the conversation by commenting below!