Justin Trudeau Stands Firm, and then Contradicts himself on Saudi Arabia

“I don’t want to dictate to other countries what their positions should be”


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Justin Trudeau
Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau, Sept. 28, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan
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On Wednesday afternoon Justin Trudeau fielded questions at a press conference, generally to discuss the ongoing dispute with Saudi Arabia.

The male feminist groper, who admires China for their “basic dictatorship” is currently playing the role of human rights advocate.  The whole exercise was pretty tame and boring, filled with the standard barrage of “ums” and “aaahs” from the Prime Minister.

There were a few things of note that he said however…  First, he claimed that Canada will always stand up for human rights both publicly and privately.  An abject lie, unless you change the word “always” to just this once.  Currently his favourite country, China, is cracking down on the civil liberties of both Christians and Muslims.  Where is the condemnation?

When Saudi Arabia was named to the UN council on women’s rights, while women in the Kingdom were unable to leave their homes without a male guardian, where was Justin Trudeau?  When the Islamic Republic of Iran murdered a Canadian, Kavous Seyed-Emami, and took his wife hostage the Prime Minister was silent, and still continues to be!

Trudeau continued to meander through the questions and then proclaimed, “I don’t want to dictate to other countries what their positions should be”.  Oh really?  That is exactly how we got ourselves into this mess in the first place.  There is a huge difference in the eyes of the Saudis between a condemnation and a command.  Calling for the immediate release of all prisoners of conscience is a command, which the Saudis, and now it looks like Justin Trudeau, see as a violation of sovereignty.

Is it a good thing that Justin Trudeau did not apologize to Saudi Arabia? Yes.  Canada should never be seen to be taking human rights lessons from a theocratic Islamofascist dictatorship.  It would be a slap in the face to all the men and women who fought to make our great country what it is today.  A country whose values are sometimes best exemplified by men like Raif Badawi, a true human rights hero.

The economic problem we face here is because of our diplomatic weakness and lack of pipeline development, both due to the current administration. Canada doesn’t have many good options left.  We can either apologize and re-establish ties with the gulf coast, or invest in Canada and take the shackles off Alberta, letting us become self sufficient.  However, with our current leader expect neither to happen, just more hapless platitudes.


4 Comments

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  1. Canada should straight out the human rights abuses here before they worry about what people are doing elsewhere.

  2. You are wrong. He should have apologized. He/Freeland screwed up . We can’t create an economy with being at odds with every trading partner because of his ridiculous virtue signalling.

  3. This is an excellent opportunity for Canada to rid itself of any existing influence the cancerous Saudi regime has on us. We have the opportunity, to a greater extent than many of our allies, to eliminate them from our lives at a relatively low cost in the Grand scheme of things.

    1. If that was the case, the first Canadian statement should have been a suspension of trade until significant changes are made. Not a command from afar to use our legal system instead of theirs. Calling him a thoughtless boob is an insult to both the thoughtless and boobs.

Daniel Bordman

Daniel was born and raised in Toronto. He started doing stand up comedy in Kingston while getting his degree from Queens University. Since then he has gone on to win the 2012 Bragging Rights comedy contest in Toronto, and in 2012 he co-founded Civil Space Network, a show dedicated to political satire.

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