Why I’m against the changing of our national anthem

Today, the Canadian Senate voted to change the lyrics to our national anthem, altering the lyrics from “in all thy sons command” to “in all of us command.”


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Oh, Canada
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Today, the Canadian Senate voted to change the lyrics to our national anthem, altering the lyrics from “in all thy sons command” to “in all of us command.”

This change, was long advocated for and pushed by the late Member of Parliament for Ottawa-Vanier Mauril Belanger.

O Canada was commissioned by Lieutenant Governor of Quebec Théodore Robitaille in 1880 for the Sainte-Jean-Baptiste Day ceremony. In 1906, O Canada was translated into English, and in 1908 a new version of the song was written which is the version we sing today.

In 1908 the original lyrics that were sang said “thou dost in us command.” Then, in 1914 the lyrics were changed to: “in all thy sons command.”

In 1980, O Canada was designated as the Official National Anthem of Canada and has been in use ever since.

In 1990, the Toronto City Council voted in favour of recommending that the lyrics be changed to reflect the change that was passed by the Canadian Senate today.

During the proceedings, Councillor Howard Moscow stated that the word “sons” in the national anthem implied “that women can’t feel true patriotism or love for Canada.”

Feminists have felt that this change was needed because the lyrics written in 1914 were “sexist.” Despite the fact that the change was most likely implemented to honour Canadian soldiers who sacrificed their lives for our freedom.

Feminists feel that if they can dictate to Canadian society and get changes passed by our left-wing politicians that it’ll make our society “more fair and equitable.”

However, they miss the larger part of whitewashing history and they shamelessly do it in the name of equality. As a Conservative, I am horrified to see this change implemented as it is disrespectful to our heritage, our men in uniform, and our veterans.

While I respect the decision that was passed by the Senate today, I am angry with this attempt to whitewash our history, something that the left and our politicians do not understand. I know that many Canadians share my dismay at the passage of this bill to change the anthem.

May we never forget our collective history, and may we work to protect our history, heritage, culture and commit to honouring the memory of our veterans who have fought and died for the freedoms that we hold dear.


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Jordan Kent

Jordan is a University of Ottawa student who believes through hard work and determination a real difference can be made.

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