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Canada is a ship that’s taking on water.

Every hour approximately three illegal migrants cross into Canada from the United States.

They arrive here, loosely vetted, and are put up in temporary shelters in already dense and populated cities.

Toronto and Montreal cannot be expected to sustain a never-ending inflow of new residents.

More migrants will mean a higher population density. Packing people into close proximity like sardines will increase the rate of violent crimes, produce even more pollution and greater rates of homelessness.

If this is what the Liberals call progress, then we are progressing towards a very bleak future indeed.

The asylum claims backlog has reached critical capacity. There are more claims in the system than the department can possibly process. Since 2016, when the border crisis began, the number of claims that haven’t received a full security clearance have increased sevenfold.

This means that there are currently 11,745 individuals in the country who have yet been properly vetted for being a potential threat for Canada’s national security.

When will it ever end?

The federal government will run out of money eventually and Canadians will be left to pick up the bill.

Historically, anti-immigrant sentiments naturally follow periods of high immigration. In the 1920’s after the US had a population boom due to immigration, the nation saw several anti-immigrant legislation pass as a response to the rapid increase.

In 1924 the United States passed the Johnson-Reed Act which placed national quotas on new immigrants, even going so far as restricting all immigration from Asia.

Whatever anti-immigrant backlash that might ensue, the Liberals will be solely responsible for it.

There is only one solution to the problem which the government desperately overlooks: stop the inflow and process the backlog. Until then, there’s no foreseeable end to the current situation.

The bright side of the situation is that the crux of the problem isn’t the entire border.

The avenues for illegal crossings are small identifiable pockets, mainly bordering Quebec. If we can identify the problem, we can identify a solution.

Border officials need to close Roxham road and other prominent crossing points and begin to enforce strict border security measures until all illegal border crossers are properly assessed and processed.

Until then the crisis will continue and no progress will be made. Neither for Canadians nor the individuals waiting for a hearing.