Canadian child sex offender took $15,000 taxpayer-funded trip to father’s funeral

The records show that the government agency paid to have two officers escort Snook, who is currently serving an 18 year sentence after he pleaded guilty in 2013 to 46 sex crimes against 17 children, including sexual assault, making and distributing child pornography and extortion.
The records show that the government agency paid to have two officers escort Snook, who is currently serving an 18 year sentence after he pleaded guilty in 2013 to 46 sex crimes against 17 children, including sexual assault, making and distributing child pornography and extortion.

Convicted child sex offender Donnie Snook’s trip to his father’s funeral in St. John’s, N.L., cost Correctional Services Canada (CSC) $15,000, according to federal records.

The records show that the government agency paid to have two officers escort Snook, who is currently serving an 18-year sentence after he pleaded guilty in 2013 to 46 sex crimes against 17 children. The charges included sexual assault, making and distributing child pornography and extortion.

Snook, a former St. John city councillor and youth pastor, was granted a temporary absence from prison following the death of his father on February 24th. The funeral was held on March 1st in St. John’s.

The total cost of Snook’s trip was $15,183.16. The largest part of this expense was the 98.5 hours of overtime for the two officers who accompanied Snook, which totaled $6,829.61.

Other notable costs include $5852.70 for flights to and from St. John’s as well as $138.60 for a travel management fee and $94.50 in baggage fees.

While Snook was housed in Her Majesty’s Penitentiary, CSC had to pay $978.56 to put up the two correctional officers in a hotel. This cost also included a rental car, fuel, and airport parking.

Due to privacy legislation, it is not known where Snook traveled from. As of 2014, Snook was serving his sentence at a prison in Mission, B.C.

It is possible that Snook was asked to cover some of these expenses himself. A prisoner released on a temporary absence could chip in to cover part of the costs using the money from their prison earnings fund.

According to the Parole Board of Canada, Snook was eligible for full parole this year but waived his parole review scheduled for this month.

His next legislated review for full parole will be in April 2024.