A bill that would ban cosmetic animal testing in Canada has finally grown legs and has started its journey through the House of Commons.

Conservative MP Marilyn Gladu’s Bill S-214 was tabled early Friday afternoon.

“Protecting animals has always been a cause that I care deeply about,” she said to the House. “I am pleased to sponsor this bill so MPs can debate this important issue.”

The bill, which has been around since late 2015, was constructed and introduced by Conservative Sen. Carolyn Stewart Olson. The Cruelty-free Cosmetics Act would end cosmetic testing on animals in Canada. It would also restrict the sale of cosmetics developed or manufactured through the use of animal testing.

The bill would ban all evidence concluded from animal testing, and that no animal testing may be used to establish the safety of a cosmetic developed in Canada or elsewhere. In October 2017, members of the Senate Standing Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology voted in favour of S-214. Also, last June, the chamber voted in favour of sending it to the House.

Unfortunately for Gladu, there have been complications in the progress. Despite strong support, Gladu says there have been more difficulties than she expected.

Animal advocates and the cosmetic industry want the proposed legislation to mirror the EU’s laws to ensure that there will be less future problems involved in trade through the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement.

Gladu has said she feels “totally disappointed” that it has taken so much time “to get everyone on the same page.”

Unfortunately deadlines continue to come and pass, and she had expected to table it the week of March 18, though unfortunately it did not come to fruition then.

Gladu states that she was intended to be on her caucus approval list that week, but due to higher priorities such as the budget and the Conservatives triggering a marathon voting session in the House surrounding the SNC-scandal, she got “kicked off the agenda.”

She’s also been traveling with the House health committee as part of its study of methamphetamine abuse.

“It wouldn’t have mattered if we were here anyway, as the government keeps moving to orders of the day.”

If this bill were to be passed, Canada would join the likes of the EU, India, Taiwan, Guatemala, New Zealand, Australia, and South Korea in banning animal testing. SImilar legislation is in the works globally, with the US, Brazil, Chile, South Africa, and Sri Lanka all following suit.

The cruel practice is outdated, as there are now an array of options for cosmetic companies to test their products without cruelty towards animals being in the equation. Many are saying that there is absolutely no need to rely on the suffering of animals.

Sen. Stewart Olsen has called it “a backward practice that has no place in Canada,” and is pleased to see her bill moving along.

“I fully understand the length of time it takes to get a private member’s bill passed,” she said. “It can be very frustrating for the sponsor of the bill, but it is our system. I am very hopeful that the bill will proceed through the stages and pass. So many people have supported this bill and I would hate to see them disappointed.”

The 21st century approach to animal rights has long been developing and progressing rapidly, as there are now more vegans on Earth than ever. Within sentiments like those fall anti-animal cruelty activists and groups which help bills like these become law.

Animals do not have a choice in these matters, and the extensive cruelty that they experience in tests like these are often grueling, typically keeping animals in small spaces, and robbing them of a healthy life.

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